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Structural Biology

PGR-RA-49

Expertise of research area
biochemistry biophysics; biological molecules; Structural Virology; molecular biology; Structural Biology


Coronavirus information for applicants and offer holders

We hope that by the time you’re ready to start your studies with us the situation with COVID-19 will have eased. However, please be aware, we will continue to review our courses and other elements of the student experience in response to COVID-19 and we may need to adapt our provision to ensure students remain safe. For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, regularly visit our website, which we will continue to update as the situation changes www.leeds.ac.uk/covid19faqs

<h2 class="heading hide-accessible">Summary</h2>

The structure of biological molecules and the complexes they form underpins most biological function. Therefore, structural biology is a key tool in modern biological discovery. We want to understand the structures of biomolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, and the complexes they form.

<h2 class="heading hide-accessible">Full description</h2>

<p>Structural biology also encompasses understanding how those structures move, and incorporates the principles of molecular biology, biochemistry biophysics, modelling and simulation. Our research themes include:</p> <h3><a href="https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/structural-biology/doc/structural-biology-research-themes/page/1">Proteostasis</a></h3> <p>Proteins perform a vast array of functions, underpinning every aspect of biology. Research in proteostasis seeks to understand the lifecycle of protein molecules: how they are made, folded, and degraded, and how disease results when these processes go wrong.</p> <h3><a href="https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/structural-biology/doc/structural-biology-research-themes/page/2">Structural Virology</a></h3> <p>Viruses are obligate parasites that infect hosts in all kingdoms of life. Understanding the structure of viruses, viral proteins, and the complexes they form with host proteins is therefore critical in human and animal health, and in food security.</p> <h3><a href="https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/structural-biology/doc/structural-biology-research-themes/page/3">Macromolecular Complexes</a></h3> <p>Researchers in Leeds are working to understand the structure and function of a diverse array of macromolecular complexes, including those involved in metabolism, transport, and antimicrobial resistance.</p> <h3><a href="https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/structural-biology/doc/structural-biology-research-themes/page/4">Signaling and Cancer</a></h3> <p>A major interest of researchers in Leeds is to understand cellular signaling &ndash; the basic processes and communication that underpins normal cellular function &ndash; and how these signaling pathways become deranged in disease, especially cancer.</p>

<h2 class="heading">How to apply</h2>

<p>If you are interested in a&nbsp;product in this research area please search for our <a href="https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/research-degrees/doc/how-to-apply">research opportunities</a>.&nbsp;</p>

<h2 class="heading">Contact details</h2>

<p>For further information please contact the Graduate School Office<br /> e: <a href="mailto:https://biologicalsciences.leeds.ac.uk/research-degrees">fbsgrads</a><a href="mailto:EMAIL@leeds.ac.uk">@leeds.ac.uk</a>, t: +44 (0)113 343 8186</p>


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<h2 class="heading heading--sm">Linked funding opportunities</h2>